Security Encyclopedia

Domain Name System (DNS)

The Domain Name System (DNS) is a database that matches website names with their corresponding Internet Protocol (IP) addresses. Specifically, the framework maps the written alphanumeric name people use to find a website to the numerical IP address that a browser uses to find a site.

DNS begins with the practical notion that people surfing the web have no desire or realistic ability to reach websites through knowledge of byzantine IP addresses. Therefore, the service was instituted to enable the growth of the Internet as a feature that makes it commercially viable.

Browsers and other ancillary services depend on DNS to rapidly provide the data required to connect users to remote hosts. DNS mapping is disseminated all through the web in a chain of command of power.

Governments, universities and enterprises register their own groups of IP addresses grouped by an alphanumeric domain name. They additionally ordinarily run DNS servers to deal with the mapping of those names to those addresses.

Example:

“Check out one of the domain seller websites to see if the URL you want is available. I use GoDaddy for DNS lookups of what’s available.”